Garvin: Managing Quality (1988)

The eight dimensions of product quality according to Garvin:

1. Performance or the primary operating characteristics of a product or service.
Example: for a car: it is speed and acceleration. For a restaurant: it is good food.

2. Features or the secondary characteristics of a product or service.
Example: for a restaurant: it is linen tablecloths and napkins.

3. Conformance or the match with specifications or pre established standards.
Example: for a part: it is whether this part is the right size. For a restaurant: it is whether the meat is cooked according to your request (e.g. "medium rare").

4. Durability or product life.
Example: for a light bulb: it is how long it works before the filament burns out.

5. Reliability or the frequency with which a product or service fails.
Example: for a car: it is how often it needs repair. For an airline: it is how often flights depart on schedule.

6. Serviceability or the speed, courtesy and competence of repair.
Example: for a car: it is how quickly and easily it can be repaired and how long it stays repaired. For a mail order house: it is the speed and courtesy with which an overcharge is corrected.

7. Appearance / aesthetics or fits and finishes.
Example: for a product or service: it is its look, feel, sound, taste or smell.

8. Image / perceived quality or reputation.
Example: for a product or service: it is the positive or negative feelings people attach to any new offerings, based on their past experiences with the company.

Note: dimension number 8 is of another nature; modern literature distinguishes between product quality (dimension 1 thru 7), quality of service (the service which is bundled with the product) and image (dimension 8)

Literature: see under tab data, reference 1.0

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